Marcus Marr – Killing Jarr

Social media is allowing people to communicate in revolutionary ways. Its never been easier to keep up with old acquaintances or connect with complete strangers.

Never been easier isn’t always a positive thing. Genuine connection becomes diluted as people frantically scramble to gain attention – releasing a fire hose of worthless self-promotion.

But then there are exceptions that cloud the issue. Billboard.com reports that Marcus Marr, a South London DJ, and Chet Faker, Australian neo-soul singer, met via Twitter messenger. There was a re-tweet, messages exchanged, voice memos swapped, and then eventually an EP with progressive, cranium-expanding music.

Interesting, right?

Follow Faker and Marcus Marr closely.

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Friday’s Song: Chet Faker x WKND – Lover

How often do we come across new music while on the subway? I don’t mean by eavesdropping on a fellow straphanger as they click ‘next’ on their smartphone. Nor do I mean that if someone’s Beats are playing so loud as to make you want to cry out like your grandmama, “Turn that damn ratchet down!” is what I mean. This is something altogether different. Perhaps it’s a cover band playing for singles during rush hour, or a brass ensemble that’s taken to the trenches of late-night weekend train platforms. It’s just sometimes, a beautiful sound is overheard underground.

The band Sonia Dada formed after such a chance encounter in the Chicago underground in 1990. Band frontman Daniel Pritzker came across his future bandmates who were then busking for change in a subway station. While the band never reached such cultish adoration as their fellow Chicagoans, Wilco, today, they get some love here on The Aftermath.

Offered to appear on the Australian radio station show Like a Version, where the guest artist plays a cover of their choice, hometown hero Chet Faker lent his one-man-gospel-sound to Sonia Dada’s best selling record, “Lover (You Don’t Treat Me No Good)”. Now, this being the Internet Age, Faker’s rather pared down and acoustic rendition of “Lover” could not be left alone for long.

German producer WKND (no connection to the sexahaulic Canadian), has imbued Faker’s version of “Lover” with metal drums and a beat to dance to. The kid has flipped the cover into a remix – and I’m all the more grateful for having come across it @boycalledwknd. Yet, each of these versions are enjoyable in their own way; each a telling of a different time and circumstance, but of the same story.